Music for the High Holy Days

Recorded by Cantor Judy Ribnick with the help of Rabbi Carie Carter and Angela Weisl

Once again, we are pleased to share these songs and melodies with you in the hopes of enhancing your experience of the Days of Awe.  They include old favorites and new melodies for our community.  We look forward to singing these and many other songs with you together on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur when we gather for what we hope will continue to be the spirited, participatory, inspiring davenning that has been a hallmark of

High Holy Days at PSJC

In all cases, the texts of these songs are available in Machzor Lev Shalem edited by Rabbi Edward Feld and in supplemental packets we will distribute on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.  All page numbers refer to the Machzor Lev Shalem.  They are presented here in the general order in which we will encounter them in the service.  Below that, they will be presented in alphabetical order.  You can search for the newest additions by simply glancing to the side of each title where you will find the year it was added to our resource page.

May the melodies of this season enter our hearts, allowing each of us as individuals and all of us as a community to search our hearts and bring ourselves forward to a place where we can embrace and celebrate the New Year before us.  Shana Tova U’metukah!  May 5774 be filled with goodness and sweetness for us all!

Rabbi Carie Carter
Cantor Judy Ribnick

*Technical Note: All of the following links are to mp3 files. You can either click and listen through your browser, or right-click and save the mp3 to your computer.


Shofar Blast
The call of the Shofar brings us to attention and reminds us of the potential power of change at the heart of this season.
Shofar Blast

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EREV ROSH HASHANAH

Rosh Hashanah Greeting 5773 (2012)

Traditional Ashkenazic High Holiday evening service melody; English words by Sylvia F. Goldstein
Rosh Hashanah Greeting

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Rosh Hashanah Greeting 5774  (2013)

Traditional Ashkenazic High Holy Day evening service melody with English words by Sylvia F. Goldstein, adapted by Rabbi Carie Carter and Angela Weisl

Rosh Hashana Greeting 5774 click the link to play music

Maariv Nusach (2009)

This special melody (nusach) is used only for the nights of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.
Maariv Nusach

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Barchu into Ma’avir Yom p. 5  (2013)

The traditional Ashkenazic High Holy Day evening service melody is sung for Barchu (the call to prayer) and the first blessing of the Shema.

Barchu into Ma’avir Yom  click the link to play music

Shema (2009)  p. 6

Shema is one of the central prayers of Judaism.  It is recited at numerous points in the High Holy Day service, but this melody is used in the Ma’ariv (evening service) for the Days of Awe.  The melody was composed by 19th century Austrian composer, Solomon Sulzer.  Sulzer is known as “the father of the modern cantorate”. On Yom Kippur, we recite Baruch Shem K’vod out loud, while it is said silently the rest of the year.

Shema

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Mi Chamocha p. 8  (2013)

The traditional Ashkenazic High Holy Day evening service melody is used for Mi Chamocha (Who is like You), part of the Geula, the prayer for redemption that transitions us from Shema to the Amidah.

Mi Chamocha click the link to play music

Hatzi Kaddish p. 10  (2013)

The traditional Ashkenazic High Holy Day evening service melody is sung for Hatzi Kaddish during the Maariv Service of the Days of Awe.

Hatzi Kaddish 

Achot Ketanah (2009)

Achot K’tana (Little Sister) is a Moroccan piyut sung on the first evening of Rosh Hashanah.  In this hymn by Abraham Hazzan Gerondi, we pray that the troubles of the old year may cease and that the new year may bring a harvest of blessing.  From “Songs of the Jews of Calcutta” edited by Rahel Masleah.

Achot Ketanah

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Achat Shaalti (2009)  p. 27
One thing I ask, for this I yearn, to dwell in the God’s house forever, to behold God’s beauty, to be in God’s sanctuary. Taken from Psalm 27, the Psalm for the Days of Awe. Melody: Israel Katz

Achat Shallti

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Duet for Elul (2011)
From Psalm 121 and Psalm 27; Arranged by Andrew Bernard

Combining two powerful psalms of yearning for the Days of Awe, this duet asks: I lift up my eyes toward the heavens, from where will my help come? My help comes from God, maker of heaven and earth.

Achat Sha’alti, drawn from Psalm 27, the Psalm for the Days of Awe, expresses a single desire, the longing of this season: One thing I ask, for this I yearn, to dwell in God’s house all the days of my life, to behold God’s beauty, to pray in God’s sanctuary.

Duet for Elul

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Yigdal (2012) p. 28
Based upon Maimonides thirteen principles of faith, Yigdal serves as the closing prayer for evening services on Shabbat and holidays.  This melody is used specifically for the Days of Awe.
Yigdal

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ROSH HASHANAH SHACHARIT
9–Zochreinu L’chayim (2009) p. 82

Remember us to life. . .Write us in the Book of Life. This line is inserted in the first blessing of the Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur Amidah. Melody: Israel Goldfarb.

Zochreinu L’chayim

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Y’varechecha (2012) p. 91
This powerful liturgical piece is recited at the end of each repetition of the Amidah.  Drawn from the Book of Numbers, “the Priestly blessing” is also at the heart of the blessing children are offered by parents on Shabbat  It expresses the heartfelt prayer:  “May God bless you and keep you;  May God’s face shine on you and be gracious to you; May God lift up God’s face to you and grant you peace.”  May this be God’s will!   Music:  Sol Zim

Y’varechecha

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Sim Shalom (2009) p. 91

With these final words of the morning Amidah, we pray simply:  Grant us peace!   Melody:  Meir Finkelstein
Sim Shalom

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B’sefer Chayim (2009) p. 91

With this addition to the Amidah of Yamim Noraim, we express our desire to be “inscribed in the Book of Life”.  Melody by Israel Goldfarb.
B’sefer Chayim

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Avinu Malkeinu (2009) p. 92

Our father (our mother), our Ruler, have compassion upon us and answer us…. These words and this haunting melody are at the heart of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Whether we feel close or distant from God, this prayer is a promise of connection. Folk melody

Avinu Malkeinu

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ROSH HASHANAH TORAH SERVICE

V’zot Hatorah (2012) p. 106
This is the Torah, God’s word by Moses’ hand, which Moses set before the people of Israel. Melody by David Lefkowitz

V’zot Hatorah

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Hashiveinu (Koktzker hasidim)  (2009) p. 123

This melody is a PSJC favorite and wends its way through the service. It is drawn from the final lines of the Torah service. Sung to the Niggun of the Kotzker Hasidim, we pray: Turn to us, O God, and we shall return. Renew our lives as in days of old
Hashiveinu

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ROSH HASHANAH TORAH SERVICE—HEALING AND PEACE

Esa Einai (2009)

I lift up my eyes to the heavens from whence my help will come. Taken from Psalm 121. Melody: Shlomo Carlebach.

Esa Einai

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Esa Einai II  (2013)

I lift up my eyes to the hills. . .searching for the help I need. . .

This song of hope is taken from Psalm 121:1-2.  The melody presented here is to “Hallelujah” by Leonard Cohen as sung by Kol Halev chorus, Temple Beth Emeth- Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Esa Einai II click the  link to play music

Refaeinu/Healing Song (2009) 

Heal us Adonai, and we shall be healed.
Save us and we shall be saved.
Ana El na refa na lanu—O, God, please heal us!
Heal our bodies. Open our hearts.  Awaken our minds, Shechina.

This combination of songs (the first drawn from the text of the Amidah and arranged by Natasha Hirschhorn; the second composed by Aryeh Hirschfield) guide us through our personal prayers for healing at the center of the Torah service on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

Refaeinu

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Healing Song II (2013)

This powerful prayer that God will please grant us all a complete healing is based on Moses’ prayer in the Book of Numbers on behalf of his sister, Miriam.  The English was adapted by Cantor Judy Ribnick, and the melody is by Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach.

Healing Song II click the link to play music

Elohei Oz (2009)

My God, strength of my praise, heal me, and I will be healed. . . This piyut, drawn from the music of Calcutta, alludes to Refaeinu, the healing blessing in the Amidah, and speaks of God as healer of the people.  It was transmitted to us by Rahel Musleah through her work “Songs of the Jews of Calcutta”.

Elohei Oz

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Oseh Shalom–Kirtan (2009)  p. 138
May God who makes peace in the high places, grant peace to us, to all Israel and to all who dwell on earth.  This prayer, which concludes both Kaddish and the Amidah has been set to many melodies.  This rendition is from Kabbalah Kirtan by YofiYah (Susan Deikman).  Kabbalah Kirtan is an “ecstatic form of worship” that is a “call and response repetition of sacred Hebrew and Aramaic.  This melody is presented as heard on “Kabbalah Kirtan” by YofiYah, 2006, Sounds True recording.

Oseh Shalom — Kirtan

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Shalom Canon (2009)
One simple word that can heal the world—Shalom—Peace. Melody: Louise Treitman.
Shalom

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ROSH HASHANAH MUSAF

Sfatai Tiftach (2013)

O God, Open up my lips that I begin to pray. . .

This kavanah opens our hearts each time we enter into the Amidah.  Translation and melody by Hannah Tiferet Siegel.  Arranged by Fran Avni.

Sfatai Tiftach click the  link to play music

Unetaneh Tokef (2011/2012) p. 143

These first words of Unetaneh Tokef help us focus on the holiness and the power of these days of awe.  Music (Opening, Louis Lewandowski; Middle, Adoph Katchko)

Unetaneh Tokef

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K’vakarat Ro-ei edro (2011) p. 143

From Unetaneh Tokef Music, Elecha melody, Shlomo Carlebach

All that lives on earth shall pass before You like a flock of sheep. As a shepherd examines the flock, making each sheep pass under the staff, so You will review and number and count, judging each living being, determining the fate of everything in creation, inscribing their destiny.

K’vakarat Roei edro

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B’rosh Hashanah–Ashkenazic (2009) p. 143

Taken from Unetaneh Tokef, this powerful prayer captures the image of Yamim Noraim—that on Rosh Hashanah it is written and on Yom Kippur it is sealed… how our lives will be in the coming year. The prayer ends with a promise: Teshuvah, u’Tefillah, u’Tzedakah ma’avirim et ro-ah hagezerah… that Teshuvah (turning and repentance), Tefillah (prayer) and Tzedakah (righteous/just action) will help us better face whatever the future may hold.

B’rosh Hashanah–Ashkenazic

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B’rosh Hashanah—Muncasz (2009) p. 143

This melody is from the Munkacz hassidic community in Hungary. It is brought to us by Tova Klein as was sung by her father and grandfather.

B’rosh Hashanah—Muncasz

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Adam Yesodo (2012) p. 144

From Unetaneh Tokef  Melody, Abram Brodach

A reminder of our own smallness and mortality, in comparison to the greatness of God.

Adam Yesodo

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V’chol Maaminim (2012) p. 146

Composed by one of the earliest of liturgical poets, Yannai, this piyut is a double acrostic emphasizing the many attributes of God.

Melody: Hasidic
V’chol Maaminim

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Uv’chein, And Then (2013)

The lyrics of this song help us focus on the self reflection of this season and brings us to a place of longing for a time “when wholeness and peace are restored” and we are all “remembering what all life is for”.

The three traditional Uv’chein paragraphs of Yamim Noraim are found at the center of the Amidah for the Days of Awe, touching on the major themes of Rosh Hashanah:  Malchuyot (the unity of God), Zichronot (remembrance) and Shofarot (the possibilities of redemption).  Words and music by Alisa Fineman.

Uv’chein, And Then click the  link to play  music

Aleinu (2011) p.

from Malchuyot of Rosh Hashanah

Though its popularity resulted in its use at the conclusion of each service, this prayer was actually created specifically for the Malchuyot service of Rosh Hashanah. In this context, Aleinu gives us all an opportunity to prostrate ourselves to the ground, to pray to God with body and soul as well as heart and voice.   Melody:  “MiSinai – Very old traditional tune”

Aleinu

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Shehu Noteh shamayim (2010) p.

This version of the verses “She-hu Noteh Shamayim” – “…the One who spreads out the heavens” [found in Aleinu and recited at the conclusion of each service] is a majestic, wonderful melody adapted from a traditional Sephardic rendering of Shirat Ya-yam ( The Song at the Sea which the Israelites sang upon escaping from Egypt and successfully crossing the Sea of Reeds in the Book of Exodus).  The melody (“Bendigamos”) is commonly used for Birkat Hamazon (Grace after Meals).  The song was set and adapted by Richard Botton.

Shehu Noteh shamayim

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Holy Holy Holy pt. 1  (2011)

Lyrics: Liturgy. Sung by MercyMe as transmitted by Rick Recht and Susan Glickman. Adapted by Judy Ribnick

This is the first of a 3 part harmony for this melody.
Holy Holy Holy

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Holy Holy Holy pt. 2  (2011)

Lyrics: Liturgy. Sung by MercyMe as transmitted by Rick Recht and Susan Glickman. Adapted by Judy Ribnick

This is the second of a 3 part harmony for this melody.

Holy Holy Holy pt 2

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Holy Holy Holy pt. 3  (2011)

Lyrics: Liturgy. Sung by MercyMe as transmitted by Rick Recht and Susan Glickman. Adapted by Judy Ribnick

This is the third of a 3 part harmony for this melody.

Holy Holy Holy pt 3

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Holy Ground (2010)

The place we are standing can be holy ground.  This moment can be holy time.  We need only take notice.  This is the overriding message of this song and is a central theme to these Days of Awe.  Woody Guthrie (a native of Coney Island) wrote this song in 1954 and Frank London and the Klezmatics set it to music 5 decades later.  It contains a prominent verse from Exodus when Moses encounters the Burning Bush.

Inspired by the melody and the message of this piece, we adapted this text to carry us through the three central themes of Musaf for Rosh Hashanah, Malchuyot (God’s sovereignty), Zichronot (Remembrance) and Shofarot (the Shofar blasts), while holding on to Guthrie’s original message: If we allow it to be, the place we are standing is indeed “holy ground”.

Adapted and shared with us by Lisa B. Segal of Kolot Chayeinu and further adapted by Carter/Ribnick/Burhenne.

Holy Ground

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 Psalm 150  (2013)

With every instrument at our disposal–

With every breath—our soul sings to You the mystery

Halleluyah!

This is the inspiring close to the Book of Psalms, and to Pseukei D’zimra (the preliminary service each morning).  Because of its reference to praising God with the voice of the Shofar, we are lucky enough to find Psalm 150 in Shofarot, the final of the three special sections of the Musaf Amidah for Rosh Hashanah as well.

Melody:  Michael Praetorius  (1571-1621)/Sufi Chant

Words adapted by Rabbi Danielle Upbin

Psalm 150 click the link to play music

Hava Nashira (2010)

Hava Nashira, Shir Hallelujah! (Come, let us sing a song of praise!)

This melody, composed by Josh Nelson Music (BMI) is a 3-part canon that gives a new feel to a familiar and inspiring phrase and reminds us of the power that is ours when we raise our voice in song.

Hava Nashira

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Hayom Harat Olam (2009) p. 158

Today the world was brought into being.  This passage concludes each of the three sections of the musaf Amidah unique to the Rosh Hashanah service.  Music by Hanna Tiferet, arranged by Nomi Fenson.

Hayom Harat Olam

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Areshet Sefateinu (2009) p. 158
May the Prayers of our lips be pleasing to You is sung just after the Shofar call at the end of each of the three special sections of the Rosh Hashanah Musaf Amidah, Malchuyot, Zichronot and Shofarot. Melody:  Sol Zim

Areshet Sefateinu

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Hayom T’amtzeinu (2009) p. 169
This final piyut of the Musaf service for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur reminds us of the importance of the moment, the importance of “hayom”, “today”.  Melody: Traditional Ashkenazic

Hayom T’amtzeinu

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Kaddish Shalem  (Hasidic) (2012) p. 171

From the Liturgy sung at the conclusion of the Service on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, this melody lifts the energy of the community to a great high.

Melody:  Yossele Rosenblatt/David Kusevitsky

Kaddish Shalem

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L’shono Toyva (2012)

A Yiddish song of welcome.  “We send greetings, loud and clear, to all people.  “Happy New Year!  A good year!”.  Text:  Sh. Tsesler; Music by Chana Mlotek.

L’shono Toyva

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YOM KIPPUR

Or Zarua (2009)

Light is sown for the righteous and joy for the upright in heart. This song introduces Kol Nidrei night and is sung as the Torahs are removed from the ark. Melody: Hassidic

Or Zarua

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Kol Nidrei (2011)
From the Yom Kippur Liturgy

The powerful melody of Kol Nidrei begins each and every Yom Kippur.

Melody:  Traditional Ashkenazic

Kol Nidre

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Bishiva shel Maalah (2009)

By the authority of the court above and the court below. With Divine sanction and with the sanction of this Holy Community, we declare it is lawful to pray together with those who have transgressed. Just before Kol Nidrei, we remind ourselves that despite our transgressions, we can come together to pray, and that each of us, regardless of our shortcomings and sins has a place within this community. Melody: Debbie Friedman

Bishiva shel Maalah

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Psalm for Shabbat  p. 206  (2013)

When Yom Kippur falls on Shabbat, we get to hear this beautiful rendition of Psalm 92, the Psalm for Shabbat.  Melody by Rabbi Ken Chasen.

Psalm for Shabbat   click the link to play music

Psalm 93  p. 206  (2013)

Waters may rage and roar, but above the sea and its breakers, awesome is Adonai our God.

This final Psalm of Kabbalat Shabbat is brought into the High Holy Day services on special occasions, when Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur coincides with Shabbat.  This is sung to a Yiddish melody, Volt Ich Gehat Koyech.

Psalm 93 click the link to play music

Yaaleh (2009)

May our supplications rise at nightfall, our prayers approach you at dawn. Let our exultation come at dusk. This piyut brings us through the 24 hours of Yom Kippur, moving from supplication on Kol Nidrei night to prayers throughout the day and a hope for exultation and mercy as night falls again with Neilah. Melody:Origin unknown but transmitted to Judy Ribnick by Moshe Silberschein

Yaaleh

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Haneshama Lach (2009)

Sung on Kol Nidrei night, we turn to God and remind ourselves:  The soul is Yours; the body is Your creation. . . .We have come here trusting in Your name, for you are gracious and merciful. . .pardon our iniquity, for it is great. Melody:  Shlomo Carlebach

Haneshama Lach

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Yah ana (2012)  p. 231

Piyutim, Jewish liturgical poems, are central to the services of the Days of Awe.  Piyutim have been written since Temple times, and use poetic schemes (such as an acrostic or other ordering of the Hebrew alphabet) to capture a specific theme of the day.

This piyut of Yehuda HaLevi expresses our search for God and our conviction that God will find us, even as we search for God.  As it says:

Yah ana

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Adonai, where shall I find You?
High and hidden is Your place.
And where shall I not find You?
The world is full of Your glory.

I sought your closeness,
I called to You with all my heart,
And going out to meet You
I found You coming close toward me.

Melody:    The melody for Yah, ana emtsa’kha was adapted from the Balkan Sephardic rite — centered around Sarajevo, capitol of Bosnia-Herzegovina and former capitol of Yugoslavia – by Joseph Levine, editor for the Journal of Synagogue Music and a member of the RA committee that produced Mahzor Lev Shalem.

Ki Hinei Kachomer (Spanish-Portuguese) (2009)  p. 207

We are like clay in the hands of the Creator, we say in this piyut from Yom Kippur. Adapted from Adon Olam melody used in Spanish Portuguese communities

Ki Hinei Kachomer

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Ki Hinei Kachomer (to Cuandro el Rey Nimrod) (2012) p. 207

Melody—Popular Sephardic melody

Ki Hinei Kachomer

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Mochel Avonot Amo (2009) p. 232

An introduction to Shalosh Esrei Midot (the thirteen attributes of God’s kindness and compassion), this prayer asks God to forgive the sins of the people. Melody:  traditional Ashkenazic melody

Mochel Avonot Amo

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Shema Koleinu (2009) p. 233

Throughout the day of Yom Kippur, we plead: Hear our Voice. Melody: Unknown.

Shema Kolenu

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Ki Anu Amecha (2009) p. 234

One of the most passionately sung prayers at PSJC, Ki Anu Amecha reminds us of our manifold relationship with God. We begin with: For we are Your people and You are our God, and once again ask God to forgive us, pardon us and grant us atonement. Melody: Chassidic

Ki Anu Amecha

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MARTYROLOGY/ELEH EZK’RA

Children of Poland (2012)

Words and melody, Si Kahn

Children of Poland

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YIZKOR OF YOM KIPPUR

Zichronam Livracha (2009)

We are blessed remembering you. Drawn from traditional liturgy, the music and English words for this song were written by Anita Schubert.

Zichronam Livracha

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Psalm 23  (2009) p. 293

Though we walk through the valley of the shadow of death. . . This famous Psalm is sung at the conclusion of PSJC’s Yizkor service.  Melody:  Ben Zion Shenker

Psalm 23

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Oseh Shalom—Spanish-Portuguese (2009)—p. 294

May God who makes peace in the high places, grant peace to us, to all Israel and to all who dwell on earth. This final line of Kaddish is one of our most basic prayers, namely that we, with God’s help, can create peace in our world. The traditional text asks for peace for us and for all Israel. We add the phrase v’al kol yoshvei tevel (and all who dwell on earth) as a reminder that until there is peace for all, there can be true peace for none. Melody: Spanish Portuguese.

Oseh Shalom

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NEILAH

El Nora Alila (2009) p. 407
God who does wonderously. Knowing that the day is drawing to a close, this Sephardic piyut is sung at the start of Neilah, giving us one more opportunity to pray for God’s pardon. Piyyut composed by Moses Ibn Ezra, 11th century. Melody: Sephardic, Mizrachi communities.

El Nora Alila

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Shema with 3 parts (2009) p. 429

The watchword of the Jewish faith: Hear O Israel, Adonai is our God, Adonai is one. This verse, combined with Baruch Shem (Blessed is God’s glorious name forever) and Adonai Hu HaElohim (Adonai is God) are the final words of the deathbed confessional in Judaism, and thus they are the last words recited at the Neilah service on Yom Kippur, just moments before the Shofar is blown. This melody is a PSJC Classic and is usually sung on Rosh Hashanah during Malchuyot as well as at the end of Yom Kippur. Judy Ribnick learned it years ago at Elat  Chayyim. Melody: Unknown.

Shema

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Shema at Neila (2009) p. 429

With this powerful affirmation of Shema (1x), Baruch Shem (3x) an Adonai hu ha-elohim (7x), we reach the end of the Neila service of Yom Kippur.  It is sung to a traditional Ashkenazic melody.

Shema at Neila

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ADDITIONAL SONGS FOR YAMIM NORAIM

Adon HaSelichot (2009)

Master of Forgiveness…have mercy on us even as we have sinned. This religious poem, or piyyut, is recited by the Sephardic, Mizrachi and Moroccan communities. This melody comes from Moroccan tradition.

Adon HaSelichot

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Collect Into One (2012)

Collect into one your memories.  Collect into one your hopes and your dreams.  Collect into one your destiny.  Collect into one all that life brings.  Bring us in peace from the four corners of the earth.   Music and lyrics by Craig Taubman.

Collect Into One

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59–Eilecha (2009)
To You, Adonai will I call. Before You will I plead. Hear me, Adonai; be gracious. Be my help. Taken from Psalm 30. Melody: Hassidic.

Shema

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Hashiveinu Yah (2009)  p. 123
Return to us God, and we shall return. Melody: Shefa Gold

Hashivenu Yah

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Ken BaKodesh (2009)
Surely I behold You in holiness. Seeing Your strength and Your glory. My spirit thirsts for You, my flesh yearns for You. Psalm 63:1-2. Melody: Hassidic

Ken BaKodesh

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Rewrite (2011)
Music/lyrics by Paul Simon from the album, “So Beautiful or So What”; lyrics adapted by Judy Ribnick

Rewrite

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Sanctuary (2012)
May the words of my mouth and the meditations of my heart, be acceptable to You, O God, my Rock and my Redeemer.  O Lord, prepare me to be a sanctuary pure and holy tried and true in thanksgiving I’ll be a’living sanctuary for you.

Text taken from Psalm 19:14 and Exodus 25:8. Music and lyrics by John W. Thompson and Randy Scruggs with additional Hebrew and additional text by David Ingber.

Sanctuary

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Shalom Shalom LaRachok v’LaKarov (2010)  p. 2
Shalom Shalom LaRachok v’Lakarov—Shalom (Peace) Shalom (Peace) to those far off and to those who are near.  Taken from the book of Isaiah, these welcoming words are a part of the Haftorah for Yom Kippur, and they are the first words we see in our Machzor, Lev Shalem.  It is our hope and prayer that the services we share at the Park Slope Jewish Center will be welcoming and full and filled with Shalom for those who easily walk into our doors and those whose journey here has been long and difficult.  To those who have come from afar and those who are close by, we say Shalom, welcome.  These words are set to a majestic and beautiful Sephardic rendering of Shirat Hayam (the Song recounting the Crossing of the Sea of Reeds following the Exodus from Egypt).

Shalom Shalom LaRachok

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Yesh Adonai Bamakom Hazeh (2009)
Composed by Cantor Natasha Hirschhorn. . . . These words (God is in this place) are drawn from the Book of Genesis when Jacob awakens from a dream and says: Behold, God was in this place, and I, I did not know.How often is this the case for us? This song is an affirmation that if we look closely enough, we will see that indeed God’s presence is here, in this place, within these people.

Yesh Adonai Bamakom Hazeh

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Shema with 3 parts (2009)—A FINAL WORD
The watchword of the Jewish faith: Hear O Israel, Adonai is our God, Adonai is one. This verse, combined with Baruch Shem (Blessed is God’s glorious name forever) and Adonai Hu HaElohim (Adonai is God) are the final words of the deathbed confessional in Judaism, and thus they are the last words recited at the Neilah service on Yom Kippur, just moments before the Shofar is blown. This melody is a PSJC Classic and is usually sung on Rosh Hashanah during Malchuyot as well as at the end of Yom Kippur. Judy Ribnick learned it years ago at Elat Chayyim. Melody: Unknown.

Shema with 3 parts

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